Maine Coastal Protection employs a variety of techniques to protect vulnerable shorelines from erosion due to storm damage, wave action, overland runoff, receding banks and loss of vegetation. 

Hard Engineered

We build and repair seawalls and revetments. These ‘hard engineered’ structures help to protect shorelines against waves, rising tides and storm damage.

This is your alt tag
Seawall
This is your alt tag
Revetment
This is your alt tag
Rock filled Marine Mattress

Soft Engineered

Soft engineering, also called bioengineering, is an environmentally sensitive technique employed to help stabilize eroding shorelines and slumping banks. We use natural, biodegradable erosion control materials such as geotextile fabrics and coir logs in combination with native plants. These products stabilize the ground surface while the plants' root system becomes established.

This is your alt tag
Coir Log stabilize the toe of the slope
This is your alt tag
Geotextile fabric stabilizes the bank

Native Vegetation and Invasive Plant Removal

Shallow-rooted, invasive plants undermine slope stability as they displace native vegetation. Native plants, with extensive root systems, help to stabilize slopes and reduce erosion. Below are a few of the native plants we use.

This is your alt tag
Bayberry
This is your alt tag
Rosa Rugosa
This is your alt tag
Panicum

Combination of Techniques

The slide shows below illustrate our process and a variety of techniques we employ. Coir logs help to reduce the loss of vegetation in the tidal zone; a revetment stabilizes the toe and the lower bank; and native plants and biodegradable fabric help to stabilize the upper bank until the vegetation takes hold.

Freeport, ME: Fringe marsh restoration and bank stabilization project